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Failure is Freedom

By: Darwin Tomlinson, Executive Creative Director, DDB Sydney
@dar1t

After several days of living in a frenzy of FOMO panic, I’m starting to gain some deep insight into my fear of failure. I appear to be taking the lean method’s “Fail fast, fail often” ethos quite literally. Missed sessions, missed parties, missed taxi’s… Fail. Fail. Fail. 

Of course I’m not alone. It’s the SXSW way to be constantly missing out on something. There’s a strange liberation that comes with the notion that you are 100% guaranteed to fail at seeing everything. It seems clear that’s the basis of the creative spirit that underpins all of this - the freedom to fail big is a necessary component for any monumental creative or inventive output.

Certainly that applies to the Lean methods discussed in Adobe’s software prototyping session. Almost everything their product team makes fails. And I saw it in the conversation with Ralph Steadman as well. Gonzo journalism was nothing without its ability to completely screw up. In fact,  screwing things up was pretty much Hunter S. Thompson’s greatest creative ability. And then there’s Steadman’s work - a cacophony of splatters and mishaps that come together into these mad, genius drawings. Even the Pulp documentary was essentially a story about how a bunch of working class kids failed by becoming superstars (but sort of on purpose).

What I’ve found most interesting about it all is that the more you let go, the more you seem to find. For every session missed, I’ve happened upon a conversation even more interesting. The errant taxi became a brisk walk home and one last taco for the day. I can’t say that these things are yet making me more creative, but surely they’re adding to the arsenal. 

Let’s see how far astray I can go today.

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Let’s go Karting! Photo courtesy of @minjiaqiu from @DDBCalifornia.


Click on our Twitter tab to see all DDBot photos.
Let’s go Karting! Photo courtesy of @minjiaqiu from @DDBCalifornia.

Click on our Twitter tab to see all DDBot photos.

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Addictive Storytelling

By: Juan Isaza, Strategic Planning/Social Media Director for DDB Latina
@JuanIsaza

A good session was “Secrets Behind Addictive Storytelling” (#addictive). It made me think about the simplicity behind great stories: life, death, love, risk, etc. There is nothing “complicated” behind finding the topic. Very common subjects we talk about every day get really compelling in the hands of a good storyteller. What makes stories addictive is finding the hook that is able to connect with people’s life. The magic is in the way the story is told. A different perspective on a very common or well known issue. So, as one of the presenters said, “it is all about finding the angle.” And, many times, further than the topic, what makes a story addictive is finding the right characters to tell the story and making the subject come to life. Good stories are recognized immediately. You won’t need more than 30 seconds to say “here is a great story.”

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DDBot does outer space  at #SXSW2014 exhibit hall. 
Click here to view all DDBot photos or visit our Twitter tab. 

DDBot does outer space  at  exhibit hall. 

Click here to view all DDBot photos or visit our Twitter tab. 

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DDB New Zealand’s Digital Creative Director, Haydn Kerr shares five big take aways from SXSW 2014. Click here to check them out  

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From @Heydinker: Google glass are like the new segway. A Geek accessory that’s impossible to pull off. #SXSW14 #ddbdoesaustin

From @Heydinker: Google glass are like the new segway. A Geek accessory that’s impossible to pull off.

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Insights from Nicole Taylor, Managing Partner at DDB Sydney

I’m loving Austin and SXSW (beyond not being able to get a cab and the necessary lining up for almost everything). It’s diverse, certainly not “just for the kids,” as even my mum who is a child psychologist, would benefit greatly from a lot of the speakers and content. I’m about to hear a session about trends this year at SXSW but two things stand out for me so far…

1) We don’t truly understand the power of the Internet yet, so you can still expect plenty of exciting times ahead.

2) Social good is increasingly at the heart of where we are going with digital/Internet. It’s our chance to make things better and big brands are key in making that happen.

Finally, Tilda Swinton is an incredibly intelligent and amazing artist. She talked openly and freely about her incredible career and perspectives including love of cinema.

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Joanne Trout, Vice President, Global Communications for Omnicom Group, at the #OmnicomWomen Reception with her DDBot in hand. 

Joanne Trout, Vice President, Global Communications for Omnicom Group, at the #OmnicomWomen Reception with her DDBot in hand. 

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#OmnicomWomen Reception

On the evening of Saturday March 8, Fleishman Hillard hosted the #OmnicomWomen Reception at its Black Box Lounge at the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, TX. Omnicom agency executives attended the exclusive celebration in honor of International Women’s Day (IWD) and the network’s efforts to elevate the celebration of women around the world. 

An outpouring of content and support for IWD from across the agencies within Omnicom lead to 5.6 million impressions on Twitter. 

In support of IWD and #OmnicomWomen, DDB Worldwide launched “Empower,” a website featuring photos of real women from across the DDB Network. “Empower” was featured on screen at the reception along side the efforts of other Omnicom agencies.

 To read more about DDB Worldwide’s International Women’s Day initiatives click here.

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Some insights from @adplannergirl:

Brands are more than logo/ colors/iconic character. Navigation can be part of brand ID & loved by users.